The 2.8 million New Yorkers receiving monthly grocery subsidies through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps, are not in immediate danger of losing those benefits, even though the department that funds them is one of nine affected by the shutdown.

Benefits for January were already funded when the Agriculture Department got cut off on Dec. 21. And Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced last week that the department had found enough money to provide SNAP payments for February if the budget standoff lasted that long.

His department also expects to be able to continue funding through February a separate food support program for the poor known as Women, Infants, and Children, or WIC.

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, a Cold Spring Democrat, warned Thursday that the shutdown is blocking funding for programs that benefit Hudson Valley growers in the five-year farm bill that Congress recently passed. He urged the Senate to take up bills that the House passed that day that would reopen closed agencies like the Department of Transportation and their funding spigots.

“We just got some great news for farmers with the 2018 Farm Bill, but it doesn’t do a lick of good if you don’t fund the programs and have people working at offices like the one in Middletown,” Maloney said in a statement.

Maloney and Antonio Delgado, the new representative for New York's 19th Congressional District, were among more than 100 House Democrats who signed a letter last week asking Perdue how his department plans to continue providing SNAP benefits if the shutdown continues, and if the department had stopped adding new retailers to the program after furloughing most of its staff.